No Scalpel Vasectomy: The Safer, Easier Procedure For Male Birth Control

If you’re thinking about having a vasectomy, but are afraid of the procedure or the recovery time, there’s good news. Vasectomies don’t have to be performed by scalpel; in fact, more and more vasectomies are being performed with what’s called no scalpel vasectomy, which is actually safer, easier, and less painful than standard vasectomies, according to recent studies. This detailed guide will explain how no scalpel vasectomy works and its benefits over traditional scalpel vasectomies.

Introduction:

A vasectomy is a procedure that cuts and seals the tubes that carry the sperm from the testicles to the semen. That means that ejaculations will no longer carry sperm, preventing conception during sexual intercourse. Traditionally a vasectomy is done with an incision in order to access and tie off the tubes. However, in recent years doctors have been using a different technique to perform vasectomies called no scalpel vasectomy where they use only instruments in order to create small punctures in the skin of the scrotum. This technique has become more popular because it is less invasive than traditional methods as well as is safer and easier on patients.

What Is A Vasectomy?

A vasacotomy is a procedure for male birth control. It entails cutting and sealing the tubes that carry the sperm from the testicles to the semen. That means that ejaculations will no longer carry sperm, preventing conception during sexual intercourse.
Doctors use a scalpel to make an incision in the skin over each side of the scrotum. After making another incision inside each side of the scrotum, they cut and seal off the two tubes that carry sperm. They then sew up both sides of your scrotum with stitches or staples.

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What Happens During a Vasectomy?

A vasectomy is a surgical procedure for male birth control. It entails cutting and sealing the tubes that carry the sperm from the testicles to the semen. That means that ejaculations will no longer carry sperm, preventing conception during sexual intercourse. A vasectomy is typically performed with no scalpel in an outpatient setting. An instrument called a vas deferens clamp may be used to isolate and cut off each vas deferens tube. Using a small cautery device called electrocautery, heat is applied to seal off the ends of each tube in order to prevent sperm from coming out through ejaculation or leakage during normal urination. Patients can expect some discomfort after surgery but it should be minimal and usually gone within 2 weeks of surgery.

Results & Recovery:

The procedure is performed with a local anesthetic and takes about 15-30 minutes. Patients can go back to work or school the following day. It does not affect erections or sex drive. There are two kinds of vasectomies: open and closed. Open means that the doctor makes one or two cuts in the skin on each side of the scrotum to reach the vas deferens and then sews them up (using dissolvable stitches). Closed means that a surgeon makes one small incision near each testicle and pushes them through a hole in the scrotum to reach the vas deferens.

Risks & Side Effects:

Side effects from vasectomies are uncommon. However, there is a small chance of complications including bleeding or infection. An allergic reaction to the anesthetic can also occur. Some men may experience some pain during the procedure and report feelings of heaviness in their testicles. In rare cases, there may be serious complications such as an inability to ejaculate after the surgery. For most men, these side effects are very mild and go away within a few days or weeks following the surgery.

Are There Alternatives?

Dr. Justin J. Shenker is a urologist with over 15 years of experience in providing the highest quality vasectomy care. Dr. Shenker and his team specialize in the No-Scalpel Vasectomy (NSV) procedure which has been shown to be safer and less painful than standard procedures. NSVs are performed in an office setting with no incisions or stitches to heal. Patients can typically resume normal activities after surgery, including driving, working, and exercising within 24 hours of the procedure. If you have any questions about vasectomies or would like to schedule an appointment please contact us today!

How Do I Get It?

Dr. Gonzalo Duran is the founder of Complete Healthcare America and has been practicing medicine since 1996. He specializes in family planning and vasectomies. He was a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists from 1997-2007 and served as president from 2000-2001. Dr. Duran received his medical degree from Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (Mexico) in 1983 and completed his residency at St Luke’s Episcopal Hospital (Texas). He currently resides in Houston, Texas with his wife and children.

Why Would I Choose This Over Other Methods?

With the need to wear a condom every time we have sex, or deal with hormonal birth control methods like the pill, it can feel like there are a lot of hoops to jump through when it comes to preventing pregnancy. But there’s another option that doesn’t involve hormones or latex barriers – No-Scalpel Vasectomy. A vasectomy is a procedure for male birth control that entails cutting and sealing the tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the semen. That means ejaculations will no longer carry sperm, preventing conception during sexual intercourse.

Where Can I Get One Done?

There are many physicians who offer vasectomies. Patients should ask their doctors to give them a list of providers that offer the new no scalpel vasectomy. This will assure them of access to the newest, safest procedure.
The procedure is usually done in a doctor’s office and takes about 20 minutes. Patients must have a driver because they need someone with them when they return home after surgery. It is typically little or no downtime and most patients can resume normal activities in one week.
It is important to note that not all insurance companies cover the cost of the procedure and some may require waiting periods between different types of birth control procedures.

About The Author:

Dr. Zachary D. Levine is a board-certified urologic surgeon with over twenty years of experience performing vasectomies at the Urology Group in New York City. He has been recognized by Castle Connolly and America’s Top Doctors as one of the nation’s top doctors and named one of New York Magazine’s Best Doctors.
Men who are considering vasectomies often have questions about what to expect during the procedure, how it will affect their sex lives, or whether they should do it at all. In this post, Dr. Levine answers some common questions about no scalpel vasectomy (NSV).
What is NSV?

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